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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to handle the fiscal cliff? 48% believe president obama and republicans will reach an agreement but 43% say they won't. meantime, president obama is giving a stern warning to republicans who may be trying to use the debt ceiling as leverage. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to debt ceiling votes and take us to the brink of default once again as part of a budget negotiation, which by the way we have never done in our history until we did it last year, i will not play that game. >> we should say that the president and house speaker john boehner did speak by phone yesterday. that was the first time in a week. no one is saying what the conversation was about. shortly after that call treasury secretary tim geithner went on cnbc and said the white house is ready to go off the cliff. >> if republicans do not agree to that, is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff in. >> absolutely. there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest. it's only 2%. >> i want to bring in "usa today" b
an election. you saw it on the other side, republicans complained with some justification that obama rather than focusing on the economy went ahead with obama care and he paid for that. i think you're going to see the same sort of backlash here where voters have been saying very clearly they want action on the economy. now it becomes sort of an anti--union effort that has very little to do in the short term with the economy. so maybe, you know, they may be able to get their right to work thing through there but there will be the inevitable backlash. >> it is interesting that the congressional delegation, that there are a lot of members who are there now talking to the governor, jackie. what do you think? what's going on in that room right now? >> i think it also varies state to state i'd like to add. something that worked in wisconsin won't necessarily work in ohio. we saw that during some of the scott walker drama that went down. ohio, unions won. wisconsin, unions lost. michigan, another union heavy state, we could see something else entirely. that said the president going there and most
the white house out there, you know, publicly putting pressure on republicans by sending obama, for example, to michigan but gamt trying to negotiate behind the scenes with boehner. and it's a two-prong strategy that i think carries real risk. >> it's kind of negotiation 101. i mean, the most basic kind of negotiation, you know, don't show your hand if you don't have to. i'm wondering, matt, is part of this psychological, even real in terms of momentum, democrats feel they have the upper hand and so they don't need to do anything right now. >> can we just take a moment and recognize it's december 10th, december 11th and people are out on the road making politics about this and occasionally meeting and talking about maybe exchanging ideas? this is kind of a big deal, you know? in this same way that passing a buck -- we were told that for a long time. >> for a long time. if there was any kind of seriousness of purpose, and i'm not pointing out either party, you know, one over the other but neither is having a seriousness of purpose about passing budget, about sitting down and talking about th
of republicans, billy kristol and others say that there's going to be about $1 trillion in tax increases. president obama won the election. he's pressing on that. now we're seeing tom cole of oklahoma and other republicans saying that let's get through this process and move on to the next issue. a lot of them have seceded this fight. president obama has a lot of refer rage. >> a lot of members in congress are talking about this but they don't really have any influence in it just looking at outside. not everybody is happy about it. bernie sanders, the independent from vermont, says that the senate needs to find a way to make its self more relevant and, you know, it seems like their question, david, is is this any way to run a democracy? >> this is the only way to get a deal. the members have a right to vote against anything that they are against. but there's no way that you can have a negotiation between two competing sides if you have one individual on one side and 400 individuals on the other. it just doesn't work. so what the speak ser going to have to do is go back to his members, har
. 46% are opposed. let me bring in executive director of log cabin republicans, r. clark cooper, and democratic strategist and former dnc advisor to the obama '08 campaign, jamal simmons. gentlemen, good morning. >> good morning. >> opposition to gay marriage has obviously softened, even among conservatives. here's what george will had to say about the issue. >> this decision by the supreme court came 31 days after an election day in which three states for the first time endorsed same sex marriage. they could see it's now safe to look at this because there is something like an emerging consensus. quite riliterally, the oppositi to gay marriage is dying. >> here's what he's talking about. look at the numbers from a "washington post" poll. 66% of young people support same sex unions. 33% oppose, but if you look at 65 plus, the numbers are almost exactly the opposite. so i'm wondering, is it no longer a question of if gay marriage will be legal, but when, and if that's the case, how do you get your fellow republicans on board after they made such a very strong statement in their pl
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)